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Old February 16th, 2010, 10:59 AM
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Default Hood numbers, paint, markings, etc.

Paint:

From 1944 to 1957, the US Army used Semi Gloss Olive Drab #23070. It was then replaced with Semi Gloss Olive Drab #24087. This was used until the 4 color cammo scheme was introduced in the 1975-76 timeframe. So any US Army truck built in the era of the M715's would have come out of the factory wearing the #24087. The 4 color cammo pattern gave way to the present 3 color cammo pattern, the NATO pattern, in the mid-80's. Many M715s were out of service by then but may have been repainted to the 4 color cammo pattern before being removed from service. Undoubtedly some were in service long enough to possibly have been repainted to the newer 3 color cammo pattern as well leaving all 3 open to use with the Semi Gloss Olive Drab #24087 being original factory stock for the US Army trucks and the 4 color cammo being next in popularity. The US Marine Corps used a different paint on their vehicles. The correct paint for those is #24052 Forrest Green.


General Markings info:

From the Factory, the markings on the vehicles would be few. Things like the Unit Markings, the bumper numbers, would have not been applied until the truck reached the unit it was intended for. So to make a "Correct Factory" look, one would have no such markings. The hood numbers , stars and some other stenciling would be there.

Painted Markings:

From about 1957-1975, most of the markings on the vehicles were painted on using Lusterless White #37875.

Pressure Sensitive Markings:
Begining in 1964, permanent pressure sensitive markings were allowed to be applied. Note all markings should be the same type....either painted or pressure sensitive, but not a mixture except for the stars, which are allowed in either style even if that differs from the style of the rest of the markings. For US Army vehicles the pressure sensitive markings are white vinyl. For the US Marine Corps, yellow vinyl is used. For the US Air Force yellow reflectorized markings were used on the blue trucks but not on olive drab trucks....though I have no notes on what they used on those.

Stars....correctly called the National Symbol:
The National Symbol, the 5 pointed star, is used on all the trucks except those of the US Marine Corps and are to be applied in the largest area of the:

Top of truck, 20 inch size for the hood
Both sides of truck, 14 inch size for the doors
Front of truck, 5 inch size for the front bumper
Rear of truck, 6 inch size for the tailgate

It is never applied to canvas or vinyl tops or covers. It also is not applied to any area where it could be covered up by canvas, windshields when folded, or where any spares or other items might hide it.
As to the orientation of the National Symbol, on horizontal surfaces, one point should point directly forward toward the front of the truck. For WWII vehicles, the star points the other direction, so one does see the National Symbol pointing toward the rear on the older trucks, but it is not correct for the Vietnam era and later vehicles. On vertical surfaces, one point always points straight up to the sky. One may see WWII vehicles with the National Symbol in a circle. This is an invasion marking and is never correct for the M715 family. Note that ambulances, like the M725, would never have the National Symbol.

Hood Numbers:

The numbers found on the hood of military vehicles are divided into 2 parts. The letter/number code is referred to as the Registration Number, or sometimes the USA Number, and the Agency ID, which tells the branch of service, for example US Army. The Registration Number is put on the vehicle at the time it is originally built and it stays with the truck for its entire lifespan. Only in very unusual cases is it ever changed. Around 1964, the specification for the markings of the Registration Number and Agency ID was set at 3 inch figures. Only where space did not allow for the use of the 3 inch size was a smaller size allowable. The military technical bulletin defining proper markings indicates that, for the Agency ID, there should be periods after the U and the S in U.S. Army. Looking carefully at the pictures and illustrations in the same publication shows no periods are shown. Pictures from Vietnam show a mix of some trucks with and some without. It certainly appears that the abscence of periods is more common than the inclusion of them in this area. Placement is on the hood, on the sides at the edges and on the tailgate. On the hood, the Agency ID is on top with the Registration Number being applied 2 inches below. On the tailgate, they are in a line, not one atop the other.

What the numbers and letters in the Registration Number indicate is the subject of many inquiries I receive. Here is the information I have on this subject:

Starting in 1960, anything older does not apply, the hood numbers would look something like this example:

3A 0001

The 3 indicates the vehicles vehicle class. This class runs from 3/4 ton to 1 1/4 ton. Any military vehicles, like 6X6's for example, with a load rating between those weight limits would start with this number. The A and the 0001 work together to show which number of medium weight vehicle built that this one is. A 0001 would be the first, A 9999 would be the 9999th one built. The next one, #10,000, built would be B 0001. Once 9999 were built as B's, the marking would change to C 0001 at number 19,999 and so on.

In 1968, the military changed the Registration Number system again and now included a year in the Registration Number as well. A sample of this style looks like this:

03A00168

The 03 still refers to the medium weight vehicle class.
The A and the 001 work together just as described for the earlier system, though only accounting for 999 vehicles before changing to the next letter instead of the previous methods 9999 limit. The 68 is the year, 1968, and does not change for any vehicle made that year.

Due to the fact that ALL medium weight vehicles, not just the M715/M724/M725/M726's, are included in these numbers, trying to use the Serial Number stamped on an M7xx to establish the Registration Number for the truck in question, when the original is not known, becomes an impossible task. It is possible to create a period correct looking number but establishing that it is the correct one for a given truck just wont happen.

In the early 70's the system changed again to the system that is still in use today. So our trucks fall into one of the 2 methods above, unlike the WWII trucks and unlike the modern trucks as well.


Unit Markings:

These are the number/letter markings found on the front and rear bumpers of the trucks. The US Marine Corps did not use these markings. For the other branches of the military, these markings were required to be in the largest practical size but not over 4 inches in height. Any symbols used outside the normal letters and numbers were to be as close to the same size as the lettering. Initially these were to be of paint that could be removed with gasoline or removable vinyl letters.

Reading such markings from left to right on a front bumper would tell us a lot about the vehicles assignment, to include:

1. The Major Command it is assigned to
2. The Intermediate Command it is assigned to
3. The Unit or Activity it is assigned to
4. The vehicle number for convoy purposes, aka: Order of March

If the truck in question was actually in Vietnam, it is possible that it could have had artwork on it that was added over there and was unit specific or one of a kind. This would be like nose art on WWII fighters and bombers. I have never seen any on an M715 but that doesnt mean there wasnt any. Anything of this type would need to be researched to find correct pictures of a specific truck with specific markings. Such markings are outside the scope of this posting.

Miscellaneous Markings

There are several other markings one may encounter on military trucks. Common to the M715/M724/M725/M726's are tire pressures, maximum permissible speed and fuel tank expansion. The following are from the military regulations regarding these markings as they apply to our trucks:

Tire Pressure should be marked in 1 inch letters above each wheel. It should also be marked on the dash even though it it often listed on the dash mounted data plate. They are to be marked with the letters TP, location, if needed, and then the pressure, where TP indicates Tire Pressure, example:

TP Front 25
TP Rear 45

Maximum Speed, if not listed on the vehicle operation data plate should be stenciled on the dash in this fashion:

MAX SPEED XX

Where XX indicates the maximum speed.

(Note: Even though the max speed is listed on the vehicle operation data plate, many M715's, including mine, have the MAX SPEED stenciled on the dash....mine lists 60 MPH as the MAX SPEED, I have seen 55 MPH and 45 MPH as well. I am not sure what the data plates on all the trucks reads, if it is the same as the stenciling or not, but I know this number does vary.)

Fuel Tanks that are not readily visible are to be marked as near as possible to the filler neck with 1 inch letters stating the following:

CAUTION DO NOT OVERFILL-ALLOW FOR EXPANSION

It is interesting to note than on vehicles where the tank is easy to see, like a 6X6 with the tank out in the open, the marking is a line placed 2 inches down from the top of the tank and the words:

CAUTION
DO NOT FILL ABOVE THIS LINE

So one could make the assumption that our tanks should not be filled higher than that level as well. This gives an idea what the intent was from the military perspective on "overfilling".


Bridge Weight Classification Markings

The Bridge Weight Placard that attaches to the front of the truck can come in yellow or Olive Drab. I do not have any information on which is correct for our trucks but I have seen both. I do know that the yellow used is Lusterless Yellow #33538 and the black that is used with the yellow is Gloss Black #17038. Besides being on the grille mounted placard, a 6 inch circle in yellow on the doors with the base weight class on it is appropriate. In our case the base weight class is 4.


Good Driver Sticker

Also known as DA Label 76, the Good Driver sticker is a list of 20 items that the military driver should live by. These are correct for all years of the M715/M724/M725/M726 production. It is a water transfer decal in yellow with a black border on it. Most commonly on the M715, they are found on the dash panel, either to the right or left of the steering wheel. They are sometimes found on the drivers door but this is uncommon.


Gauge Markings

The military regulations state that all of the gauges should have their function stenciled below them in white on the instrument panel. I dont remember seeing an M715 with this stenciling before a restoration except under the high beam indicator where High Beam is usually stenciled and under the fuel gauge where Fuel is stenciled. I have seen a few trucks where the owners added this stenciling during a restoration. I think this one could go either way and actually may not have been part of the original stenciling applied either at the factory or with the unit unless it was so specified in a specific unit or command. It does not appear to have seen widespread application on these trucks. Even in the manuals, there are occasionally pictures which show 1 or 2 gauges with a stenciling but not all 4 and not always the same ones when there are any marke
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  #2  
Old March 2nd, 2010, 04:36 PM
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This is a good and helpfull statement.

However, I have to make some commends / additions.

Somewhere I have a copy from a manual of the markings of WWII vehicles which says that the star / national symbol has to point forward on the engine hood /cab roof (GMC closed cab f.e.). Refer f.e. to TM 9-850. However, all pics I own shows the WWII vehicles (wheeled) with the star pointing towards the wind shield, which was easier to paint.

Hood numbers: Generaly correcet, however in Europe the US Army started for easier controll to change to the chassis number somewhen in the end of the 60's. They had a big lot of mixture right here. After repainting (and loosing the original number) they just put the VIN below U.S.ARMY or sometime the ordering lot number including the VIN, which sometimes made a 20 diged number or they used only the last 10 digeds of it. REO hoods were long enough for that.

Later they changed to a six didget registration number like NO5113. So far I did not find a system behind that. Many M101 A1 trailers were marked like this stile. Mine is made in October 1968 and was marked that way. To avoid truble with the authorities I remarked mine with BI7256, which contains my telefon number, however looks original.

At least in Europe the Army unit markings changed several times and the vehicles did not neccessarily follow the system, depending on the unit.
Somewhen in the early 70's for example a vehicle number after the unit code starting with a 9 was belonging to the maintanance group of the unit / company / battalion. (HQ 92 was the second maintanance vehicle of the maintanance group of the headquarter company, the trailer of that truck had HQ-92T, the first vehicle usually was a M151, the second a 3/4 or 5/4 ton truck, the third a 5 ton wrecker).

Color in Germany was usually olive drab, or in German RAL nomenclature braunolive RAL 6022, at leat in Berlin alway gloss and polished to a shining surface, others were semi gloss or matt. When they changed to the 4 colour patern (My M715 was repainted to that patern when I got it), the colour was matt, hood numbers were VIN. When I sanded that down, I found 3F????, but this did not help me.).

Weight classification: The M715 and variants is 04, when towing a trailer it is C 06. Without trailer the C must be turned round not to bee seen.(This is the same system as in the German Army. If weight per meter is over 5 metric tons, the vehicles are classed higher, but I have no references for correct classification. However, this will not apply for the vehicles we use normally.
The colour is always yellow, the green once came up in the early 80's and therefore are in bronce green and not autentic.

Speed marking: In Germany most of the trucks had on the dash (if space) or on the passenger side door the following inscription:
CITY 30 MPH
HIGHWAY 50 MPH
OTHERS 45 MPH

The limitations are according German legal requirements and make sence for a M715 vehicle.

Hope this helps a little to bring some light into the dshungle.

Wolf

P.S.:Sorry for misstiping, I'm just a German
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  #3  
Old March 18th, 2010, 07:44 PM
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Brute and Wolf,

Thanks so much for the information. It has been a while since I have been on the Zone. I am nearly finished with the truck. I am keeping it as original as possible and getting ready to stencil it. I will post photos when done for all. BTW, the manual Wolf is quoting is the 64-75 Color Markings manual and it shows the star with the point toward the front of the vehicle. I also took a look at our last MVPA Convention 2009 and the WWII vehicles point toward the cab.

Rick
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Old March 19th, 2010, 05:27 PM
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Rick,
thanks for your additional info!
Wolf
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Old July 1st, 2011, 03:29 PM
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Default M725 Hood Number Question

Gentlemen, I have a hood number question. I recently bought an M725 Serial number 12621, Delivery Date 4-68 which has been repainted so I want to put on the correct hood numbers. I also have an M715 Serial Number 12667, Delivery Date 6-67 and Hood Number 3G 7125. These trucks are only 46 serial numbers apart. What hood numbers should the M725 have? were they assigned at the factory of when they were issued?? If it was at the factory shoud it be: 3G 7079 ???

Thanks for your help!
Mike
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  #6  
Old July 1st, 2011, 05:55 PM
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Mike,

I think you will find that the numbers are completely random and do not equate to the serial number sequence. I believe that the 67 trucks had numbers like 3G 3959 (My truck in Utah). And the truck I had in Germany was 03J27168 (I found out) a 68 truck and by then, they changed the numbering system to include the year.

I copied this to a "Word" file so that I could find it:

Hood Numbers:

The numbers found on the hood of military vehicles are divided into 2 parts. The letter/number code is referred to as the Registration Number, or sometimes the USA Number, and the Agency ID, which tells the branch of service, for example US Army. The Registration Number is put on the vehicle at the time it is originally built and it stays with the truck for its entire lifespan. Only in very unusual cases is it ever changed. Around 1964, the specification for the markings of the Registration Number and Agency ID was set at 3 inch figures. Only where space did not allow for the use of the 3 inch size was a smaller size allowable. The military technical bulletin defining proper markings indicates that, for the Agency ID, there should be periods after the U and the S in U.S. Army. Looking carefully at the pictures and illustrations in the same publication shows no periods are shown. Pictures from Vietnam show a mix of some trucks with and some without. It certainly appears that the absence of periods is more common than the inclusion of them in this area. Placement is on the hood, on the sides at the edges and on the tailgate. On the hood, the Agency ID is on top with the Registration Number being applied 2 inches below. On the tailgate, they are in a line, not one atop the other.

What the numbers and letters in the Registration Number indicate is the subject of many inquiries I receive. Here is the information I have on this subject:

Starting in 1960, anything older does not apply, the hood numbers would look something like this example:

3A 0001

The 3 indicates the vehicles vehicle class. This class runs from 3/4 ton to 1 1/4 ton. Any military vehicles, like 6X6's for example, with a load rating between those weight limits would start with this number. The A and the 0001 work together to show which number of medium weight vehicle built that this one is. A 0001 would be the first, A 9999 would be the 9999th one built. The next one, #10,000, built would be B 0001. Once 9999 were built as B's, the marking would change to C 0001 at number 19,999 and so on.

In 1968, the military changed the Registration Number system again and now included a year in the Registration Number as well. A sample of this style looks like this:

03A00168

The 03 still refers to the medium weight vehicle class.
The A and the 001 work together just as described for the earlier system, though only accounting for 999 vehicles before changing to the next letter instead of the previous methods 9999 limit. The 68 is the year, 1968, and does not change for any vehicle made that year.

Due to the fact that ALL medium weight vehicles, not just the M715/M724/M725/M726's, are included in these numbers, trying to use the Serial Number stamped on an M7xx to establish the Registration Number for the truck in question, when the original is not known, becomes an impossible task. It is possible to create a period correct looking number but establishing that it is the correct one for a given truck just won’t happen.

In the early 70's the system changed again to the system that is still in use today. So our trucks fall into one of the 2 methods above, unlike the WWII trucks and unlike the modern trucks as well.

Last edited by Don Cavey; July 1st, 2011 at 05:59 PM.
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Old July 1st, 2011, 06:50 PM
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Great post Don, I didn't read it all but will later.

I would also add that the M725 had a separate sequence of serial numbers than the M715. You can notice this in the registry.

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Old July 1st, 2011, 10:37 PM
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This is going to come in really handy
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Old July 2nd, 2011, 05:25 AM
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I don't know where I found the info but it was on the web.

When I posted pictures of my army truck in Utah and the one in Neu Ulm, Germany, one of the members told me that the Utah truck was a 1967 as determined by the number (3G 3959) and that the Germany truck was a 1968 truck as determined by the numbers (03J27168). So, that info seems to agree. The picture of the Utah truck was taken in 1969 so a 1967 truck would be appropriate and the Germany truck picture was taken in 1970 so a 1968 truck would be appropriate.

As mentioned in another thread, I will most likely mark my truck to look like the Germany truck.
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Old July 2nd, 2011, 06:28 AM
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A lot of it is the same info as in the top post. It was an article written by David Doyle several years ago in Military Vehicles magazine.
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