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Old October 24th, 2011, 02:55 PM
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Default 6.2 Diesel Observations

I do not have a 6.2 in a M715. However, I have gone from zero 6.2 experience to owning 3 vehicles with them and working on a few others in the past 15 months. I just wanted to pass on a few things I learned because a lot of us are thinking 6.2 in our M715's and it will apply.

The Injection Pump is super critical to how the engine runs, starts, sounds, idles and just "feels" when you are behind the wheel.

I had a M1010 (CUCV ambulance) at my house for the past 9 months. I was to paint it and make it run better. My first drive did not impress me. The thing was a dog, hard to start hot, lost power when the throttle was released and felt like it couldn't get out of its own way. I put a brand new IP on it and WOW. That truck felt totally different, took less than a second to start hot or cold, purred like a hungry cat and actually went somewhere.

The owner came and got it yesterday. Between the body work and the IP, he said it was like having a whole new truck the differences were so great. This was after he drove it 150 miles home through the hill country.

My M1009 was getting 20-22 mpg running 60-63 highway with stock 31x10.50 tires. About a year ago I started smelling diesel after driving it once it got below 50 outside. I also found the tires I wanted at a great price. I haven't been above 19.8 mpg since the BFG 33x12.50 AT tires were put on. This is running the same gps monitored highway speeds. Which is a 6% rpm decrease because of the bigger tires.

The ip was leaking at the throttle shaft seals. Just a few drips on some days, never a river. The idle was never steady. Sounded like a gas engine set at about 25 initial timing trying to idle. It still ran down the road great, just not as easy on the fuel as before.

Because I was doing it for another person, I had to get the 1010 done first, it got the pump first. I finally saved up the money and installed mine Friday. Totally different truck. A hill leaving my house I used to have to kind of push the truck up to the speed limit was run this morning with me trying to slow it down to the speed limit. Idle is smooth as glass, constant sound out each exhaust pipe, no diesel smell or pool in the valley and lots more power at all speeds. I will post up about the expected mpg gains. If I can stay out of the fun pedal that is.

The M1010 and the M1009 are both 1985 model trucks. The 1010 had 37K miles and the 1009 has 83K. Miles don't really matter with these things. Years do. Both pumps were stock as near as I can tell. 25 years is way to old for these things based on my experience. I would almost call a 10 year limit if I get any more of these things.

Which I just did. The payment for doing the work on the 1010 was another 1009. The new 1009 which we call RED beause it is all red and a former fire truck also has a very new and shiny IP. I found some of the records in the floor board, but I think they put on the IP in 2007. Good enough for me.

My other 6.2 truck. A 1984 USAF Suburban looks to have the stock pump in it. It starts and runs great. However, I can move the throttle open some with my hand. Such as when I am charging the a/c system yet again after another part decided to leak. Holding it steady open a little and after a few seconds, the rpms will slowly start to climb. The IP is letting me know it wants to die.

Not trying to rant or lecture. I just keep telling myself this. How often have I changed plugs, cap, rotor, points, wires, set the timing, messed with advance weights, vacuum advance cans, tuned carbs, replaced jets, set the idle and mixture on a gas engine every 5-10 years? Well, the IP on a diesel is all that plus a pump and has even more exacting tolerances.

If you have a DB2, or a VE on a Cummins. Which by the way covers all US made diesel truck engines up to 1994. Unless you know the pump is less than 10 years old. I would suggest you start saving money, shopping around and making friends with your local Stanadyne guy. You will thank me the first time you drive the darn thing.
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6.2 powered M715, 5 M1009's, M416, 2 M101's, 2 M105's, 3 M35's, M1007 6.5 turbo Suburban project called Cowdog.
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Old October 24th, 2011, 07:21 PM
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Thanks for the good info Tim. My block is finally together. I'm just waiting for my buddy to get time to pick up his trailer and bring it over to my place.

I dont have the rebuilt pump that was on the 1st cracked block, but it does appear to be a newer pump. What was the price for the new IP? That was new, not rebuilt, right?
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Old October 25th, 2011, 08:06 AM
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George,
Stanadyne keeps a very tight lid on who can work on the pumps. Sure, you can buy all the rebuild parts on ebay for around $60. The CUCV/HMMWV -34 engine manual takes you through a rebuild piece by piece. However, the pump has to be flow tested and calibrated. Only Stanadyne dealers have the equipment to do that. They charge $300 for calibration when I asked. Well, some military repair depots do to.

I called the 4 dealers within 150 miles of me. All wanted between $450-$550 to rebuild a pump. I visited one of the places. What you give them is a dirty leaking thing and what comes back looks brand new and is considered brand new by the factory. Even though technically, it is a rebuild.

Kind of like airplane engines. You can get a rebuild and the engine still has all its hours, or you can get a remanufacture of the same block that will now legally have 0 hours. It is a super tolerance rebuild that is as good as new. That is what Stanadyne gives you back.

There is a place in Arizona on ebay that offers rebuilt pumps for $369. Plus you ship them a core and pay for their shipping to you. These things fit in a flat rate box, so figure $30 tops both ways. I did not use them, but many people who have report great products and fast shipping.

I went a friend of a friend route for a bit less. It took more than 2 months and when I fired it up Friday night. It wouldn't turn off. I worked on it a bunch Saturday and ended up putting my old dirty pump cover on to make it turn off and on. I am waiting to hear from the friend chain if I can get another good new cover with solenoids.

I would suggest calling Stanadyne people, visit them and then choose one with a good price and that you think will tolerate you coming in with questions or problems. Figure $400-$500 anyway you go though.

Of course, you can always go to Autozone, Rock Auto or some place like that to buy a new one for $1300.
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Old October 26th, 2011, 03:20 AM
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Good info. I'm hoping that the pump I'll be using will be a runner, at least for a year, so I can divert a few $$ to the axle swap. If the pump that is on there is not a good one, my buddy has a few.
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Old October 26th, 2011, 07:59 AM
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As always, great pointers!! Thanks Tim! Now just move yourself and family closer to me so you can work on my truck, lol!!! Only 11 inches of snow overnight.
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Old October 26th, 2011, 08:38 AM
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Mark,
Just bring your truck back to KOA June 9-16 next summer. I am taking my Scouts up there to go walk up the darn mountains.

I drove the USAF 6.2 Suburban (blue bomber) daily last week. It seemed so smooth and fast compared to the 1009. Getting into the 1009 was like stepping down in everything except noise. I have driven the 1009 everyday this week. I got back in the bomber to get to Scouts last night and it seemed slow, sluggish and rough.

To make a 4x4 with fat/tall tires and 3.08 axles go from feeling slow to feeling and being faster than a 2x4 with normal sized tires and 3.42 gears is pretty good.

Colton even remarked this morning as we were sitting at a light and not vibrating at all. "This is better than the bomber, it is so smooth."
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Old October 27th, 2011, 05:12 AM
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Have you done any fuel mileage comparisons between your trucks yet?
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Old October 27th, 2011, 08:01 AM
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I have a 70 mile drive to make tomorrow night. I will get that in to balance out my hot rodding around and top off next week. That will give me a good pump mpg comparison. Next tank will be no hot rodding and pulling a loaded (6BT going to Sermis) 101 200 miles. That should really tell me both power and mpg the difference.

The bomber has been getting 15-17 mpg tanks for the past few months. That is city, highway and camping with the Scouts. All with the a/c front and back on high all the time.
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6.2 powered M715, 5 M1009's, M416, 2 M101's, 2 M105's, 3 M35's, M1007 6.5 turbo Suburban project called Cowdog.
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Old October 27th, 2011, 09:30 PM
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If you are going to see Sermis, can you bring back my air compressor for me. Then I can bring a deuce up and pick it up from you.
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Old October 28th, 2011, 10:56 PM
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No problem on the compressor.

Due to the wreck Jennifer had. I got to put a bunch more miles on the new ip. It is now our most mechanically sound vehicle.

100 miles last night between getting to the ER, picking up Colton at his football game and then getting everyone home again. Because of the bigger tires my speedo
Eter is off a bit. I always use the gps for accurate speed readings. It was in the wrecked truck. I had thrown everything into the back of the 1009 before I followed the ambulance. Never had time to get it out and plug it in. It was always get in and drive.

I just guessed and kept my speed to around 65-70 indicated. I topped off this morning and had 15.8 mpg. That tank was with the old leaking ip, through a bunch of idling and tuning and my running around last night.

I got the gps out and checked my speed tonight. Turns out I was mentally off a bit. A steady 65 indicated was actually 73 gps. I was running 73-80 for darn near 100 miles and still got almost 16 mpg.

I will try to keep it below 65 so the before and after ip change numbers will be equal.

I did notice that not a single hill slowed me down any and very little throttle was needed. More to follow.
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6.2 powered M715, 5 M1009's, M416, 2 M101's, 2 M105's, 3 M35's, M1007 6.5 turbo Suburban project called Cowdog.
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