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  #11  
Old October 29th, 2011, 06:03 AM
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Tim, what is the tire size on the 1009?
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  #12  
Old October 29th, 2011, 02:47 PM
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Stock on a m1009 is 31 x 10.50. I have BFG 33 x 12.50 A/T's on it now.

According to the gps my odometer is off 6%. The speedometer though is about 12% slow. But, it varies so I never really pay attention and just use the gps on the highway. While keeping it 5 under in town.

Oh, actual size of the stock tires was 30" and the new tires are 32".
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  #13  
Old October 29th, 2011, 04:28 PM
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ok, cool
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  #14  
Old November 4th, 2011, 08:19 AM
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I haven't had a chance to put fuel in the 1009 since last week, so no mileage numbers.

I have had to mess with the totally mysterious glow plug/fast idle/cold advance system on the Bomber this week and thought I would share. Because if you are swapping in a 6.2, you will likely use at least one of them, if not all 3.

The 6.2 from the factory had 3 temperature senders:

Drivers side front cylinder head above the #1 injector- Temp sendor for the idiot light and if you had the 1 diesel truck with actual gauges, the gauge.

Drivers side rear of the valley-glow plug temp sender (military)/ glow plug temp sender/control (civilian)

Passenger side rear of cylinder head above the #8 injector or passenger side rear of the valley-fast idle and cold advance temperature switch.

The temp sender is just that and a mechanical or electric sender can be put in there for that purpose. Just like any other gas or diesel engine.

The glow plug sender came in at least 2 civilian versions and only 1 military version that I am aware of. It basically turns on the glow plug system no matter the version if the water temp is below 125°. Depending on the version, the "brains" of the system could be on the sensor, on the inner fender or under the dash. Put a pipe plug in this hole and just use a momentary switch for the glow plugs unless you are swapping over an intact system from a donor.

The fast idle and cold advance temp switch is the one that I am playing with this week. It really is a switch and a sensor. Constant power goes in one terminal and if the sensor says the water temp is below 75°. Then it sends power out the other terminal. The rest of the time, no power goes out.

The power going out is the green wires on the IP. One wire to the fast idle solenoid which has enough power to hold the throttle open a little, but not move it open. You have to do that by flipping or tapping the throttle pedal once the power is on. Then, it will hold the idle speed up. Factory spec is 650 rpm hot idle and 800 rpm fast idle.

The other green wire on the IP is the cold advance solenoid. Becuase the 6.2 NA engine has like 22:1 compression and is inderect injection. It only has to get a little bit of heat inside the chamber to make fire. The cold advance lets the fuel get there sooner so the colder slower fire has more time to build and make power which keeps the cold engine running.

That is the function and theory. When I picked up the bomber for Warthog a year ago next Thurdsay, he had me take it to my class. We did a bunch of other work before starting was even attempted. The fast idle solenoid never worked, but the truck started great. Took 5-10 seconds each time, but it fired up every time. A few months later, it was ready for some test driving. I started trying to get the fast idle to work and found the wire cut. I fixed it and the solenoid didn't work. I figured the problem was somewhere in the mysterious wiring system and didn't even test it for power.

It ran and I didn't worry about it. Then it became my truck and I started daily driving it once the a/c worked. I still didn't worry about it. Then it started getting below 60° some mornings. Those mornings were hard to start. I started to worry about it. A few test showed power was getting to the solenoid.

That silly solenoid is listed on the O'Reilly site as $247. Thankfully, Warthog has a truck stored at my place with a good solenoid on it. Simple swap later and I had the thing working and adjusted. Except, 10 minutes later it was still on and not turning off.

I unplugged it and idle returned to normal. Not a stuck solenoid. I unplugged the cold advance and no change in the engine. It was also burned up. That meant the switch was bad. Except nobody seems to actually have that switch. Sure, NAPA list it for $6? and amazon list it for around $20. Nobody seems to carry it though. Back to the Warthog donor truck. Different size threads.

I tried to start the truck this morning with just the glow plugs and it didn't want to. 4 glow plug cycles later and a little throttle play while cranking got it to fire up and smoke white a bunch. I need the cold advance working along with the fast idle. Fixing the cold advance is going to mean pulling the top cover off the IP and either swapping it out or pulling parts out and swapping them. A cover swap takes about 5 minutes once you figure out a pair of pliers and a 1/4" socket are all you need for everything.

Sorry for the long post, but I wanted to convey why the green wires on the IP are important and why if swapping in a 6.2 it is a good idea to keep the fast idle and cold advance switch in the system.
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Last edited by Barrman; November 4th, 2011 at 08:22 AM.
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  #15  
Old November 4th, 2011, 03:35 PM
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Man, my truck seems like a little rascals fixer upper compared to all the research and tracking down on the solenoids you do. The previous owner just put in a simple click switch for the glow plugs (I count to 5 on Colorado cold days), and a switch for the fast/cold idle. I'm fearful to even open it up because I think faith alone is what is keeping that stuff running. If I touch it, it will break, lol! That's about half the reason I haven't even started on my 6.2 swap. The other half is I'm a incompetent engine mechanic, lol!
All you guys seriously impress me when I read about the fixes and inprovements you make.
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  #16  
Old November 4th, 2011, 03:41 PM
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Good info Tim. I have the wiring ready for the 6.2. I'll be using the floor switch for the manual glow plug relay. My engine is done. I am hoping that my buddy had time to trailer it over tomorrow or Sunday afternoon.
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  #17  
Old November 21st, 2011, 11:24 AM
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Jennifer has been daily driving the 1009 for the past few weeks. She treats every stop light like a drag race oppertunity. I topped it off Thursday evening and she had gotten 16.4. Way below what I normally get. Of course, in the Suburban I used to get 2-3 mpg's more than her too. Arrive in the same amount of time but use less fuel.

She called me the other day while she was running errands over lunch in it. "You are in trouble...this thing is so fun to drive. Lots of power, great visibility, I am about 5 feet up in the air and I can go through drive thru lanes without even thinking about what I am going to run over. I like it, you can't have it back. Go find your own."

She will give it back once it gets hot again. She really, really likes a/c.

We have been invited to Beaver Creek Colorado for a week at Christmas by her sister and family. The 1009 became our transportation. I wanted to get an accurate read on what fuel was going to be running 70 for 1200 miles each way. We drove to College Station to meet up with some of my old Corps buddies Friday evening. I kept it pegged at 70 gps the 140 mile round trip. Attacked hills when I normally let the speed drop off some and drove in town like a sports car. 17.9 mpg for that run. Basically, 2325 rpm cruising.

This week we have about 300 miles of driving to do and I have put her on a 65 gps red line. Everyone who owns one of these non overdrive trucks says 65 mph is the fuel drop off. The torque curve shows 1800-2200 as the peak area. 65 mph with my tires is 2158 rpm. We will see what we get.

Then I will try to hold her to 60-62 gps, 1992 rpm, for a highway run or two and see what that gives us.

Oh, we cancelled the ski trip. Spending that much money, (Ski rental, lift tickets, fuel, resort food for a week and ski clothes) when we need to buy a real family daily driver just doesn't make sense. Would have been a fun MV adventure though.
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  #18  
Old November 23rd, 2011, 05:19 PM
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I like to answere these posts as follows:
First: You do not really need the cold advance. The engine will run evenly even at 650 rpm when cold at -20 °C (something like -4°F) after starting. The idle up to 750 rpm is not realy neccessary.
Second: Any seal will get old. If the engine did not run for more than a year the seals tend to get hard. So they have the tendency to start to drip slowly. If you run your truck on somewhat regular bases, at least for 15 years nothing will happen with the seals. The seal set is some $10, and you can replace them by youself, if you keep your working place kleep like a surgery room. Thakes with some training less than one hour when the pump lies on the table, my best time was 45 minutes. (Shwitch on the brain is required!)
With my M715 with a 6.2 l Diesel I have a fuel consumption of about 18 L /100 km without trailer and up to 22 l/100 km with trailer (depending on the terrain) (12.9 mpg solo up to 10,6 mpg w/trailer). With my M1009 I had an averange between 22 and 14 mpg depending on the use and terain (hilly, flat, with trailer, solo).
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  #19  
Old January 27th, 2021, 08:29 PM
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6.2/6.5 glow plugs came back into my life last week and I needed a part number I know I posted back when I did the M715 6.2 swap. So, I did a search and came across this thread in my way to that thread. Here is the story:

The 6.2 in the M715 has worked flawlessly for almost 8 years now. Same with the one in the m1009 and Colton’s m1009, RED. Bomber too, but it went away a few years ago for other reasons.

I liked the engine so much that 5 years ago through the help of Warthog I started another project. 1987 3/4 ton 4x4 Suburban. Surplus GEP 6500 that needed new heads was put in it. 4L80E transmission, Banks Sidewinder turbo and a few years of body work along with fitting it all together. I have been driving it around a while making all of the parts get along and making it better.

However, it never got to take a long trip. Sure, a few hundred miles and home happened a few times. But, mostly just local and daily driven. A serpentine belt system kept the truck 12 volt starter and charging system. It has always started ok. But, never as fast in any temperature as the 24 volt trucks.

I was convinced it was starter speed. Because it wanted to start, but needed to sling a second or 5 more sometimes. 100° or 24° outside temp never really seemed to make a difference. That is why I was convinced it was starter speed and not the glow plug system.

Just to be sure a few months ago I changed all 8 Delco 60G glow plugs out with fresh ones. No change. So, I used the O’Reilly’s warranty and traded the starter for another. Reduction gear in both cases. A hair improvement, but not the same as the 24 volt trucks.

I have a 1988-2000 Delco glow plug relay/control module in it. It works, the wait lite comes on and voltage is getting to all the glow plugs. I decided to live with it.

The older kids in my Trail Life troop decided they wanted to climb the highest mountain in Texas. Guadalupe Peak is about 600 miles from here. Perfect chance to use the Suburban named Cowdog for what I built it. Long distance travel at highway speeds in comfort with off road ability once there. While getting decent fuel mileage.

200 miles of city and up to 75 mph speed limit driving had me at almost 17 mpg. 82 mph for 317 miles on I-10 into a head wind while gaining a few thousand feet of elevation knocked me down below 14. But, I was passing people all the way and punching a big hole in the wind for the people following.

Our camp ground was at 3600 feet elevation. It was 35° the next morning and the truck didn’t want to start. The same temperature here at 428 feet the day before had been a normal 2-4 seconds of cranking start. It took 3 tries but it finally fired up and ran after about 10 seconds of trying.

Almost 10 hours later after reaching the summit it was 74° and we were at 5800 feet. A normal glow plug wait had it just cranking and cranking and cranking again. It finally fired with a huge while smoke cloud. I didn’t understand what was wrong.

White smoke from a diesel means not enough heat. So I knew it had to be glow plugs. But it ran so good once started I didn’t want to tear into it 600 miles from home and just let it be once I verbally the wires were connected and tight. The next morning was the same lone start issue. Voltage was still being drawn so I figured the plugs were still there and still heating.

I could only come up with elevation as the variable that had really changed. 10 hours of driving and thinking had me convinced it had to be elevation and just how diesels are in the mountains. I’ve never had a diesel above 500 feet, so I didn’t know.

Research once home had me thinking myself a fool. Then I got in the M715 to run to town and realized the exact same glow plugs with the exact same controller were glowing about twice as long as in the Cowdog. Next I got into a m1009 which has a totally different way of controlling the glow plugs. It glowed even longer than the M715. I got in the other m1009 and it was also an extremely long time compared to the M715. 15 -20 seconds longer. Found it.

I got in the Cowdog and took notice of how short the glow was. When it was finished. I tried to cycle it again and it wouldn’t. I tried the same in the M715 and it cycled over and over again. My controller was bad in the Cowdog.

I put a new one in a day ago and it was the same short glow period. But, I could cycle it back on again right away. A double cycle gave about the same glow period as the m1009 and it started faster than it ever has before. About the same as the 24 volt trucks.

Now I just need a reason to go back to altitude and see what happens.
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  #20  
Old January 28th, 2021, 09:12 AM
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I read somewhere that you could add a resistor to the controller to make the glow plugs stay on longer.
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