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Old November 14th, 2009, 05:56 AM
Mikel Mikel is offline
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Default NP200 heat

Hello,
How about this to help dissippate the NP200 excess heat?

One could easily braze (either silver braze or silicon bronze) a pocket to the NP200, put two fittings in that pocket and route the return line from the heater to that pocket. That way, the heat would be absorbed by the engine coolant and dissippated by the radiator. Brazing is very easy and there would be no need for a separate pump or cooling circuit.

Any thoughts?
Mikel
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Old November 14th, 2009, 06:42 AM
randygar randygar is offline
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Way too much work. My thought was to just screw fittings into the fill and drain plugs, and run them to a little oil cooler with its own fan and a little pump. Then my thought was "I'll just stick a np205 in like everyone else, when I do an engine swap."

--Randy
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Old November 14th, 2009, 06:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by randygar View Post
Way too much work. My thought was to just screw fittings into the fill and drain plugs, and run them to a little oil cooler with its own fan and a little pump.

How is that simpler?
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Old November 14th, 2009, 06:55 AM
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option a) remove the t-case, drain it, flush the insides, construct a box (probably involving welding or brazing and grinding the edge to a perfect match to the t-case), tap ports or weld bungs to the box, braze the box to the t-case, re-install the t-case (and linkages, dirveshafts, and everything else), run coolant lines, add a large risk of a loss of engine coolant (long hoses under the vehicle, brazing onto a high-stress part,...), refill the gear oil, and not even end up with that good of cooling, conducting all the heat through one patch of the housing, and using relatively hot fluid to try cooling it... (and restricting the flow through your heater, causing it to be less effective)

option b) zip-tie a tranny cooler with built-in fan and thermostat to it and above the crossmember, screw a little oil pump onto that, run wiring to the engine compartment (much easier than coolant hoses), screw two adapters into the t-case, add a couple feet of tranny cooler line and some hose clamps, refill, done.


Or.... wait until you do an engine swap, and put a np205 in at the same time.


--Randy
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Old November 14th, 2009, 07:01 AM
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If you are brazing why not just add cooling fins? My problem with taking coolant back to the t-case is the possibility of trail damage. Right I'm the middle there is a good place to get high centered or just dragged across stuff. You could put it on top but not too much room.

$.02
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Old November 14th, 2009, 07:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BBM715 View Post
If you are brazing why not just add cooling fins? My problem with taking coolant back to the t-case is the possibility of trail damage. Right I'm the middle there is a good place to get high centered or just dragged across stuff. You could put it on top but not too much room.

$.02
Water is MUCH more thermally conductive than air. The lines can be routed out of harm's way. That jacket could be put on top of the T/C. Doesn't need to be very thick, maybe 1/4" of space for coolant to flow through.
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Old November 14th, 2009, 07:06 AM
randygar randygar is offline
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The t-case is only filled a third of the way with fluid. It would need to be on the bottom. anywhere else and you're only cooling the air and the stuff slung off the gears to the right spot...

--Randy
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Old November 14th, 2009, 07:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by randygar View Post
The t-case is only filled a third of the way with fluid. It would need to be on the bottom. anywhere else and you're only cooling the air and the stuff slung off the gears to the right spot...

--Randy
When the thing is running, gear oil is being splashed all over, so that doesn't matter. Also, the T/C is a big/thick cast iron box, which is very thermally conductive. Even with no oil slosh, you would be able to dissipate a lot of heat from the top.
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Old November 14th, 2009, 07:10 AM
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And that case is thick. Try it and let us know. Your fab skills dwarf mine so I'd be I terested on how it turns out.
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Old November 14th, 2009, 07:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikel View Post
When the thing is running, gear oil is being splashed all over, so that doesn't matter. Also, the T/C is a big/thick cast iron box, which is very thermally conductive. Even with no oil slosh, you would be able to dissipate a lot of heat from the top.
I'm building a NP205/200 hybrid for my 6x6, which will use two of the 200's output bearing assemblies (the most likely sources of the heat). If my 205 starts overheating, this is precisely what I plan on doing.

I have two things in my favor:

-4.56 gears and 38.5 tires - RPM's should be considerably lower.
-T/C would be bolted to the transmission via a big aluminum (very conductive) adapter, acting as a big heat sink. In a M715, the NP200 sits on its own, with very little to dissipate heat elsewhere.
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