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  #211  
Old March 18th, 2020, 06:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by plumas.placer.miner View Post
Nail, Did you happen to keep the adapter from the 232 bell housing to the T-98 transmission? You can pick up 258 cores anywhere, but that adaptor is very rare.

It was the stock 230 OHC, Brian, not a 232. I do think that bell housing got away, though. It's been a while.
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  #212  
Old March 18th, 2020, 09:39 AM
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Hmmm...I must have misread. No matter.
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  #213  
Old March 19th, 2020, 12:33 AM
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The bearings came early, so my son and I got down to the task at hand.


Put new rings on the new pistons, being careful to stagger the slots on the rings to guard against blow-by. There are two compression rings and a set of oil seal rings that go on each piston.
I had to jet over to the Reno/Sparks Summit Racing Retail Store to buy a Fel-Pro gasket set. I needed the rear main seals before I could install the crankshaft!











Must clean the engine before doing this work:







Install the bearings into the crankshaft journals. Don't forget that #3 cylinder if for the thrust bearing! Make sure that the bearings sit squarely in the crankshaft bearing seats:







Then carefully place the crankshaft on the dry bearings. Be careful not to turn or move the crankshaft in any way, or it might scratch the bearings!

Plasti-gauge comes next, in case you (I) is/are wondering if the .030 oversized bearings provide correct tolerances. Place your plasti-gauge on the main journals and torque those caps down...In the correct spiraling torque order (see manual for details). Then, remove the caps and measure the width of the plasti-gauge. The tolerances are listed as being between .010 and .025.







Then, remove the Crank and liberally coat the bearings with your favorite Assembly Lube DuJour:







Now install the rear main oil seals! Once done, gently put the crankshaft back on the lubed-up bearings and torque those caps down for the last time (torque in 20 Lb increments until you reach 100 Ft/Lb (for the 258). I put a little oil on the main bearing cap bolts.

Spin the crankshaft...there should not be any binding whatsoever. Nice and smoooooth!

Next, compress the rings with the ring compressor tool. Make sure to leave some of the bottom of the lower piston body sticking out so it can go into the cylinder. Next coat the inside of the cylinder with Assembly Lube and place the #1 piston into and compressor for the #1 cylinder. Tap the first piston into the cylinder with a wooden hammer handle using the ring compression tool.

--

Don't forget to use little tubes or hoses to cover the threaded ends of the rod bolts as you tap in the pistons. You don't want that rod journal to be scratched, right?

Make certain all of the pistons are facing the correct direction...which means front (of engine)! There's an "F" and an arrow on the piston indicating its "front. with If you don't do this, (at least on the 258), the pistons could [possibly) hit the valves (especcially with a higher lobe cam), which would make for a very short drive!








Now use plasti-gauge to check the rod journal clearances. Once the rod journals pass the clearance test, push the pistons back down and then use Assembly Lube and goop up the rod bearings. Now you can tap that piston back into the cylinder until the rod bottoms out onto the crankshaft rod journal.








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Last edited by plumas.placer.miner; March 19th, 2020 at 10:23 AM.
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  #214  
Old March 19th, 2020, 12:34 AM
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Now torque down the rod cap bolts to 33 Ft/Lbs. All done!










Tomorrow (Thursday)... camshaft and timing gears install.

Note: For people who want to learn new things and are active learners, and for people who want to save some money but are willing to pay for any mistakes inevitably made while they learn, the web is an indispensable tool for learning.


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Last edited by plumas.placer.miner; March 19th, 2020 at 10:24 AM.
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  #215  
Old March 19th, 2020, 07:18 AM
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Yeah buddy-- good progress!
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  #216  
Old March 19th, 2020, 11:57 AM
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Looking good. Now, a nonsense question. What color are you going to paint it, black like the original 230 OHC?
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  #217  
Old March 19th, 2020, 02:24 PM
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Hmmm...good question Don. I liked how the last one looked with Marine Corps Forest Green block and intake manifold, but black exhaust manifold, black valve cover and black oil pan. I like to use semi-gloss enamel.

One of my mechanic friends suggested that I paint it gray with black valve cover so I could identify oil leaks quickly and thereby attempting to cut down on any smoke and stinky-ness in the cab.

I really want it to look good in case I need to sell it one day (I hope not... but one never knows in these uncertain times). This site documents everything (well, almost everything) that I have done with it and everyone suffers along the way with me...haha. Kidding. This work is resting to me because it is so different than what I do for a living these days.





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Last edited by plumas.placer.miner; March 19th, 2020 at 03:36 PM.
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  #218  
Old March 19th, 2020, 03:21 PM
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This is all I can do today. I will get paid while my college is closed, but I have to do a bunch of grading and I need to get cracking to deliver my courses online. Yeah, it's gonna suck.

I have to teach video production and editing and digital compositing and software like Photoshop, Premiere Pro, and motion logo production in After Effects. Yeah...it's like that.

But back to more interesting things...


I bought this Red Line cam paste, but my Camshaft came with a package of it, Glad I bought the extra. I don't want all of my hard work and money going to waste because of a $10 can of cam assembly paste!






Lube up the Cam journals, lobes, and the bearings inside the block. Slide that baby...slowly...in. *







This is the correct result:







Now on to the timing gears:







The small gear would not go on without some coaxing, so I gave it the acetylene treatment. After some heat, it went on with some oil and a few light taps with a small tack hammer. Tap it gingerly! There you go, EZ Breezy!








Now line up the dots cast into the gears. Use a straight-edge to make sure everything is lined up center-to-center:
(note...try to do this with a camera /phone in your other hand...)








Now for the bolt. Here's where labeling every component's parts paid me dividends! Torque that bolt down to 30 Ft/Lbs.:







Here's the result. I will put Assembly Lube on the chain and gears before I put on the timing cover! Now I will wrap it in plastic and protect it from contamination, until I can get back to it...






That's about all I can do until I get the head checked out (valve guides, surfaces, magna-flux, etc.) at the machine shop. Oh, but yes, I could spend more money...*ouch*
I suppose I am beyond the point of no return...


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Last edited by plumas.placer.miner; March 19th, 2020 at 03:50 PM.
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  #219  
Old March 28th, 2020, 07:31 PM
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The Carter BBD carb on my Jeep 258 just stopped running. I tore it apart and sure enough, the little brass tubes in the Venturi cluster were clogged. I gave them a good spritzer with carb cleaner and cleaned them out with fine wire. These carbs are known for clogging and sputtering on a hill.







I put the cluster back in and she ran good. I checked the inline fuel filter and it had crud in it. Uh huh.







I got to thinking that I didn't trust that old Carter BBD. I mean I will be taking this truck way up into the high Sierras. So, I remembered that I had the Motorcraft 2150 that I bought for the new engine.







I also bought all of the manifold adapters and the linkage adapter kit.



I had to change and bend the 5/16ths fuel line.






And the last challenge was to figure out what goes into the carb from the fuel line. It had a strange thread pattern that I couldn't match with any of my fuel line fittings. Come to find out, it was an OEM fuel filter. Luckily, There's a Summit Racing outlet in Reno, and they had two of them in stock...YAY! So I bought them both.

I also had to run a choke circuit.






She runs good. Probably give me a few more horses and better throttle response. Now I need an air filter solution that allows inflow from the valve cover. Strike that...the 2150 has a port for air flow (fumes) from the valve cover. The port is under the 5 1/8" plate that the air cleaner rests on and goes up into the air cleaner box.


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Last edited by plumas.placer.miner; March 29th, 2020 at 04:26 PM.
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  #220  
Old April 1st, 2020, 06:00 PM
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I spent the day working on my steering...

A BIG shout-out to JeepDan for his assistance and encouragement! I appreciate it. I do not know what the he** I am doing!

First I removed the steering wheel, but the bushing/bearing at the top of the column tube was stubborn and I didn't want to break it. So, I decided to work under the front of the truck on the shaft. I removed the lower shaft but the top shaft wouldn't come out, so I needed to remove the entire column tube. Then that bugger came out (that's bugger, not booger... I blew my nose before I started). *






That led to removing the steering box. Well, suffice it to say, what a rusty-dirty mess. I had to go to the store to buy more WD-40 and a Pitman arm remover. Well, the Pitman arm remover at O'Reilly's wasn't big enough to accommodate the arm on the M715 so I had to cut 1/8" off of each side of the tool so it would go over the steering gear shaft of the m715 Pitman arm (a real man pitman arm). It gave-way finally.

That top bolt holding the steering gear to the frame is a good one (if you haven't ever removed the gear before). I couldn't get my 1/2" drive ratchet in that hole so I crossed my fingers that a 3/8 drive would do it and it worked! There's just enough room to turn the bolt one click with the ratchet at a time.







I got that gearbox out and it had 50 years of grease and dirt built up on it. So, I spent the day cleaning all that stuff up with a wire brush on my drill. The rustier parts get a good soak overnight.







After cleanup, I drained the oil. I checked it for metal and it wasn't as bad as I thought it would be. I filled it with new oil and put a new breather cap on it. No telling when the last time that oil was changed!







So here's many of the parts, some of which need priming and painting. I am out of red oxide primer, so now I wait on RAPCO for the paint. I was surprised that the seal at the bottom of the steering column neck cover was intact! I use petroleum jelly to freshen rubber up, and it makes it like new again!






News at 11:00 on the next steps.

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Last edited by plumas.placer.miner; April 1st, 2020 at 06:07 PM.
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